Tag Archives: temple

Cloud Cover Over Hong Kong’s Chi Lin Nunnery

Singapore Skyline at Blue Hour

I just couldn’t escape the clouds during my time in Hong Kong, they were everywhere! And while it would have been nice to see some sunshine, they did at least provide a dramatic backdrop for some photography at the Chi Lin Nunnery.

I spent a good while in this spot waiting for the best moment to get a shot without many people in. Almost every time I was about to click the shutter another large group would enter through the front door! So I would just sigh and wait another few minutes for them to wander through.

Eventually it all came together, and I even managed to keep my camera straight whilst rushing for the shot! This was the most peaceful place I visited in the city of Hong Kong, the striking contrast to the cityscape behind impossible to ignore.

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Hanging Lanterns In Hong Kong’s Man Mo Temple

Lanterns, Man Mo Temple, Hong Kong

After a while the burning incense in Hong Kong’s Man Mo Temple was quite suffocating, but the atmosphere it created was probably the most mesmerising of any temple I’ve visited. Despite the difficulty breathing after half an hour I was still reluctant to leave.

I spent a lot of time around these lanterns. There were plenty hanging inside, and I guess you can pay to have your prayer attached to one. I have absolutely no idea what the Chinese writing says. If anybody out there has a clue I’d love to know!

It’s in situations like this I wish I had a nice prime lens with a really low f stop and nice bokeh. Then I could get some really tight focus and that nice creamy effect in the out of focus areas. But for now my kit lens will have to do!

The Buddhas Of Wat Chedi Luang

Buddhas, Wat Chedi Luang

There can be no doubt that the Buddhas of Wat Chedi Luang look their best in the dark. When dusk turns to night and the lights come on around the temple, there’s a quiet and relaxing ambiance that can’t be found during the heat of the day in Chiang Mai.

Perhaps it was because there were far fewer people, or because I wasn’t constantly on the look out for shade. Whatever the reason, this place was more magical once the sun had set, and so I spent an hour exploring the angles around the temple.

It took a while to get this shot all lined up. I was using a small mini-tripod which left me about 25cm from the ground setting up the camera. Unfortunately these things are never completely symmetrical, which I always find very disappointing!

A Wat To Remember

Wat Phra Kaew, Bangkok

The Wat Phra Kaew complex in Bangkok was so full of colour and shiny things that it was often difficult to know where to look. Whilst it was a feast for the eyes, I really struggled to get any good shots around the grounds.

There was so much going on in every direction it was hard to find a composition that didn’t feel confused or messy. So when I looked up and saw all of these nice lines in parallel I was pleasantly surprised.

Travelling around Thailand there are so many temples that it can be easy to dismiss them after a while – a phenomenon I’ve decided to call “temple tired”. However, I can’t say I suffered from this affliction.

Without exception I found each Buddhist temple we visited to be a peaceful, inspiring place. I can certainly see why people find a spiritual connection in them.

Have you visited any Buddhist temples? How did you find the experience? Maybe you got temple tired?! I’d love to hear from you.

Safety First At Wat Arun

No Entry, Wat Arun, Bangkok

After climbing to the second level of Wat Arun in Bangkok this No Entry sign was quite a surprise. The incredibly steep steps required to get to this spot were quite enough for me! I certainly don’t envy whoever has to make it to the top of this ladder for their day job.

I think one of the most important things I’ve learnt as a photographer is to always look up. It’s so easy to miss the captivating things that aren’t at eye level. I saw many people walk right by this sign without a second thought. They simply didn’t see it. But for me it was one of the most incredible sights I laid eyes on whilst visiting this famous Buddhist temple.

The array of colours was fantastic, but I wanted to draw attention to the No Entry sign. In the original shot it became lost in amongst the rest of the detail. I decided to isolate the yellow by reducing the saturation of every other colour in the shot. I think it works well here, but I’ll be sure to post a full colour image in the future that does the temple justice!

Have you visited Wat Arun? Maybe you fancy climbing this ladder?! Got any great shots in which you’ve looked up to get a different perspective? Please get in touch!

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Wat Chedi Luang After Dark

Wat Chedi Luang, Chiang Mai, Thailand

Situated in the north of Thailand, Chiang Mai offered a nice change of pace after experiencing the hectic city streets of Bangkok. Its slightly cooler temperatures were also very pleasant, despite many locals telling us it was cold! And there seemed to be a new temple to explore around almost every corner.

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