The Buddhas Of Wat Chedi Luang

Buddhas, Wat Chedi Luang

There can be no doubt that the Buddhas of Wat Chedi Luang look their best in the dark. When dusk turns to night and the lights come on around the temple, there’s a quiet and relaxing ambiance that can’t be found during the heat of the day in Chiang Mai.

Perhaps it was because there were far fewer people, or because I wasn’t constantly on the look out for shade. Whatever the reason, this place was more magical once the sun had set, and so I spent an hour exploring the angles around the temple.

It took a while to get this shot all lined up. I was using a small mini-tripod which left me about 25cm from the ground setting up the camera. Unfortunately these things are never completely symmetrical, which I always find very disappointing!

16 thoughts on “The Buddhas Of Wat Chedi Luang

  1. Karen Hewell

    Really, really beautiful. I’m so surprised you were able to get this shot in low light. I’m constantly trying to capture photos in Hanoi when the sun is setting, but can never quite get the light right when I do it. This seems to retain the same aura of darkness in these areas. 🙂

    Reply
    1. Ben Post author

      Thanks Karen. A tripod was essential for this shot, otherwise it would have had terrible noise and the detail would have been completely lost. Have you tried shooing with a tripod? It makes such a huge difference in low light situations. I’d love to visit Hanoi some day, it looks like it has some old world charm about it that would be great to experience.

      Reply
    1. Ben Post author

      Thanks Sam! Haha, being able to change lenses has certainly added an extra dimension to my photography. Although some of my favourite shots are still those I took with a point and shoot a couple of years back! A little bit of post processing goes a long way. What camera do you have at the moment?

      Reply
    1. Ben Post author

      Thanks Amy. I’m ashamed to admit I’m normally too lazy to go out in the dark with my tripod, but I’m very happy I made the effort on this occasion!

      Reply
    1. Ben Post author

      Thanks Lee. Unfortunately I wasn’t even aware of Wat Umong, I have no idea how I missed it! I’ll definitely be sure to check it out next time I’m there, it looks fascinating. I guess it’s worth the trip? Which was your favourite temple in Chiang Mai?

      Reply
  2. Stacy P. Fischer

    Yes for the tripod!! Finally beginning to get comfortable with mine and wonder what I ever did without one – well, I know what I didn’t do – I didn’t get magnificent shots like this 🙂

    Reply
    1. Ben Post author

      Haha, for sunset and night photography they’re invaluable! But I still can’t motivate myself to carry one around for daylight shots. It’s just a little bit too much with the other gear I’m already carrying on my back. My loss I guess!

      Reply
  3. judilyn

    Symmetry isn’t everything. Nice when it is natural, but not all of nature is that way, thus neither are man-made things. Non-symmetry gives the eye two things to behold and enjoy, instead of just one that is repeated. Two for the price of one!

    Virtual hugs,

    Judie

    Reply
    1. Ben Post author

      I’d never looked at it from that perspective before, but it’s so true! Actually it’s funny you mention that as I was on my way to making this conclusion myself in a more recent post. Thanks for opening my eyes!

      Reply

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